European Wood: Types, Properties & Where to Buy

European wood

European wood
European woods consist of wood species originating from European countries, such as England, France and Germany. European woods are famously used as an alternative to American woods in many parts of the world, depending on accessibility and availability. They possess many excellent properties, especially hardwoods such as Maple which are known for durability and strength.

If you are here, you are probably looking to know more about European wood species, types and properties. Well, in this article, we talk about some of the top European wood types, including oak, beech and other European species. Let’s get started.

CameroomTimberExportSARL is a top supplier and exporter of wood timber in many countries across Europe, Asia, America, and the Middle East. We have more than three decades of woodworking experience and specialise in sustainable, great-quality hardwood at wholesale rates. Contact us to know more.

European Wood Species & Types

Some of the most popular European wood/timber species include oak, maple, chestnut, cherry, beech, white ash, larch, Italian walnut, poplar, European lime, Elm, Scots pine, birch, and yew, among others.

European Oak

Oak is one of the most popular European woods. European oak, also known as English Oak, has a light-medium brown heartwood with an olive cast. The sapwood can be almost white but not always easily distinguished from the heartwood. Oak wood is rated as durable and resistant to decay, which makes it suitable for marine applications such as boatbuilding. The grain can be straight or interwoven depending on the growing conditions. The texture is coarse and uneven. It is generally easy to work with.

Common uses of English Oak include furniture, flooring, cabinetry, boatbuilding, interior trim, window frames, and fixtures.

European Maple

Maple is another very popular European hardwood. Also called Field maple, it is commonly found across Europe. The wood is considered hard with a 1,150 lbf (5,110 N) janka rating. Maple is particularly harvested for its sapwood, as the heartwood is not very strong or durable. The maple sapwood can be nearly white to off-white or cream-coloured with a golden hue. Curly grain patterns are also common. Maple grain is straight with a fine texture. Maple wood can be slightly durable to moderately durable depending on the growth cycle. It is generally very easy to work with.

Field maple is used for flooring, furniture, veneering, musical instruments, and turned objects.

European Chestnut

European Chestnut, commonly known as Sweet Chestnut or Castanea sativa, is a chestnut species found mainly in Europe and some parts of Asia. It is a moderately strong wood with a 680 lbf (3,010 N) janka rating. The heartwood is light-medium brown that becomes darker with age. The grain is straight but can also be interlocked or spiral and the texture is uneven and coarse. Despite being only moderately hard, chestnut is remarkably durable, though it is prone to insect attack. It is easy to work with both machine and hand tools.

Uses of chestnut wood include furniture, decorative veneer, carvings, barrels, masts, beams, containers, casks, fixtures, and furnishing.

European Birch

European white birch or Downy birch is found in Northern Europe and also in some regions of Asia, Greenland, and Iceland. It is a strong hardwood with a 930 lbf (4,140 N) janka rating, though durability is low and the wood is almost perishable in terms of resistance to decay, rot and insect attack. European birch has a light reddish brown heartwood and almost white sapwood. The grain is generally straight but sometimes wavy and the texture is fine and even. The wood is generally easy to work with. Priced in the same lines of oak and maple.

Popular uses of European birch include plywood, interior trim, boxes, crates, small wood items, and turned objects.

European Cherry

European Cherry or Sweet Cherry is a wood species based in Europe and Asia. It is a strong hardwood with a 1,150 lbf (5,120 N) janka rating, though it is only moderately durable. The heartwood colour varies from light pinkish brown in freshly sawn wood to deep golden brown in aged wood. Sapwood is pale yellowish. The texture is fine or medium and the grain is generally straight but sometimes wavy. Sweet Cherry can be prone to decay and insect attack. It is easy to work with both hand and machine tools.

European Cherry hardwood is commonly used for furniture, veneering, carvings, cabinetry, musical instruments, and turned objects.

European Beech

European Beech is very strong and has a 1,450 lbf (6,460 N) janka rating, though it is non-durable and has poor resistance to insects. The heartwood is pale straw-coloured with a pink hue and the grain is straight. Beech is used for flooring, boatbuilding, veneering, cabinetry, lumber, furniture, plywood, and musical instruments.

European White ash

White Ash or European Ash is a light to medium brown timber with a straight and regular grain and a medium/coarse texture. Though it has a high hardness rating, it is almost non-durable and prone to insect attack. It is used for flooring, baseball bats and other sports equipment, millwork, boxes, crates, and turned objects.

European Larch

European Larch is sourced from Central Europe. It has yellow to medium reddish brown heartwood and almost white sapwood. The grain is straight and the texture is fine to medium. The wood is moderately durable and is used for veneering, boatbuilding, flooring, and lumber.

Italian walnut, Poplar and European lime are other popular European wood species. If you want to purchase European wood timber at wholesale price, feel free to contact us to enquire about the availability, price and specifications of our wood.

Soft Maple vs Hard Maple: Key Differences In Detail

soft maple vs hard maple

soft maple vs hard maple

The two common types of maple are soft maple and hard maple. Besides being soft and hard respectively, as their name suggests, there are some other differences between the two types of maple, which we are going to discuss in detail here.

Maple is a versatile hardwood that is used in many applications, ranging from flooring to furniture, sports equipment, and cabinetry. Found almost exclusively in the Americas, Maple wood is famous for its affordability, durability and great looks. Hard maple, the most commonly used maple species, is very strong and moderately durable. It looks great both in natural colours and after staining. The smooth and straight grain pattern of maple makes it fairly easy to work with.

Types of Maple Wood

Hard Maple

  • Sugar Maple
  • Black Maple
  • Florida Maple

Soft Maple

  • Red Maple
  • Silver Maple
  • Striped Maple
  • Bigleaf Maple
  • Box Elder

What is Hard Maple?

Hard Maple (Acer saccharum), also known as rock maple or sugar maple, is the primary species in the grouping of maple species considered to be hard. The other two maple species that are often considered to be a type of hard maple are black maple and Florida maple.

Hard maple species are generally harder, stronger and denser compared to soft maple species. Another thing you should know about maple is that its sapwood is more usable than heartwood. It is the sapwood of maple that is strong and durable, while the heartwood is nearly perishable. This is why maple sapwood is commonly used for commercial purposes.
What is Soft Maple?

Soft Maple isn’t exactly a species of maple, but it’s a group of a number of maple species that are classified as “soft.” Red Maple, Silver Maple, Striped Maple, Bigleaf Maple, and Box Elder are the most common soft maple species.

Soft maple species are less strong and dense and also cost much less than hard maple.

Soft Maple vs Hard Maple

Let’s find out the various differences between hard maple and soft maple in terms of hardness, appearance, durability, properties and uses.

Hardness

Now, the most basic difference between hard maple and soft maple species is hardness. Hard maple is hard while soft maple is not so much. Soft maple can be hard and strong but not as much as hard maple. It is sometimes used in place of hard maple where the strength of the wood is not a major concern.

If we consider the janka hardness test, hard maple beats all other maple species by a big difference. While the janka rating of the hard maple is around 1,450 lbf or 6,450 N, most other maple species fall between 700 lbf to 950 lbf in terms of hardness rating. Black maple with a janka rating of 1,180 lbf is the second hardest maple species. As for soft maple species, Red maple with a janka rating of 950 lbf is the hardest soft maple.

Hard maple can be twice as hard as some soft maple species. This is because hard maple trees grow slower than other maple species.

Hardness is the best way to tell one maple apart from another.

Appearance

The thing about hard maple and soft maple is that they all look practically the same and it is not easy to tell one species from another, especially in finished pieces. All maple species, including hard maple, have almost white sapwood, which sometimes might have a reddish or yellowish hue. The heartwood of maple is reddish brown. Figured grain patterns such as curly, quilted and birdseye are common in hard maple.

It is not easy to distinguish hard maple from soft maple based on appearance. Though, experts use the wood colour and endgrain to identify it.

If you observe closely, you can see there are minor differences between the colours and grain patterns of hard maple and soft maple. Hard maple, for instance, is slightly lighter and has a more uniform colour as opposed to the darker colour with greyish streaks of soft maple. Since hard maple has a slower growth rate compared to soft maple, the growth rings are generally tighter. When seen with a magnifier, there can be observed a clear difference between the end grains of hard maple and soft maple.

Workability

Hard maple can be pretty hard, though it’s generally easy to work with because of its straight grain. However, soft maple species are even easier to work with because of their lower density. While hard maple can sometimes dull cutting edges or burn quickly, which is not an issue with soft maple.

Both hard maple and soft maple are easy to turn, glue, and finish. To avoid blotching when staining, the use of toner or gel stain is recommended.

Availability & Cost

Both hard maple and soft maple species are easily available and can be imported in all parts of the world (from a top timber exporter like CameroonTimberExportSARL). Maple is a moderately priced hardwood, though hard maple can be somewhat more expensive than soft maple species. Figured pieces of maple timber are particularly difficult and expensive to get.

Uses

Hard maple is particularly preferred for applications where strength and hardness are crucial, e.g. flooring, butcher blocks, cutting boards, and sports equipment such as baseball bats. It is also commonly used for building musical instruments, veneering, pulpwood for paper, workbenches, turned objects, and specialty items.

Soft maple is occasionally used as a replacement for hard maple in applications where strength and hardness are not a major concern. Common uses of soft maple species include musical instruments, veneering, paper, crates, boxes, pallets, turned objects, and small speciality items.

If you want to learn in more depth about maple hardwood, its types and their differences, feel free to contact CameroonTimberExportSARL to talk to an expert. We export timber and wood at wholesale prices to our customers all over the world.

Ash Wood: Properties, Characteristics & Uses

Ash Wood Properties

Ash Wood Properties

Ash is a popular American hardwood found and used in all parts of the US and around the world. It’s a strong hardwood timber that is prized for its ease of work, shock resistance, wide availability, and inexpensive rates. Ash has many varieties, with white ash and black ash being the most popular two types. Here’s everything you need to know about Ash wood , its properties, uses and types.

About Us: For more than 30 years now, CameroonTimberExportSARL has been supplying and exporting the best quality timber products and hardwoods to our clients all over the world. We have immense experience in the wood industry and expert woodworkers in our team to help you find the perfect wood for your next project. Feel free to call us or Whatsapp.

About Ash Wood

Ash or American White Ash is a hardwood primarily sourced from Eastern North America. Ash trees are about 65-100 ft (20-30 m) tall and have a 2-5 ft (.6-1.5 m) trunk diameter. The average dried weight of the wood is 675 kg/m3 and it has a 1,320 lbf (5,870 N) Janka rating. Ash is a hard, strong, heavy and dense wood.

Besides being one of the strongest and very dense hardwoods, Ash is also almost completely shock-resistant, which makes it suitable for heavy

Ash Wood Properties

ash wood properties

Appearance: The heartwood of ash is light to medium brown, and the sapwood is light brown and generally very wide. The texture is medium to coarse and the grain is usually straight, though curly or figured lumber is not uncommon.
The colour of ash is lighter than oak but the texture is similar. Ash can look strikingly similar to oak when stained.

Durability: It’s a strong and dense wood that is smooth to the touch. However, ash is almost perishable in terms of durability and is not resistant to insect attack, though some durability against decay can be seen.

Workability: Ash is generally easy to work with both machine and hand tools. It glues, polishes, and stains well. Steam bending also has good results.

Ash is often used as a cheaper alternative to oak and a more attractive alternative to beechwood, all of which share similar properties. Despite being very dense, ash is lighter in weight compared to oak.

White Ash Vs Black Ash:
White ash has a lighter hardwood and the growth rings are wider spaced compared to black ash, which has slightly darker heartwood and closely placed growth rings. Both species are non-durable.
Ash Wood Price & Availability

Ash is one of the lowest-priced utility timbers available in the US. It is widely available and can be easily sourced all around the world at a low or moderate price, moreover ash is less expensive than oak but equally valuable.

Uses

Ash is prized for its notable strength and shock resistance. Historically, it was used for making shafts for spears. In modern times, ash is being used for everything from flooring and furniture to boxes, crates, baseball bats, tool handles, millwork, turned objects, and specialty items.

Because of its excellent shock resistance capabilities, ash is the most common hardwood used for making handles for shovels, hammers and other tools. The wood absorbs most of the shock caused by the impact when using these tools.

Ashwood is also widely used for making sporting equipment, particular bats for cricket, bows, and baseball bats. Kitchen utensils, such as knives and ladles are also found made with ash. Ash timber is used for furniture making and is equally good as oak. It is also commonly used in the construction of staircases, timber frames, treads, and moulding. Because of its bending properties, ash is also suitable for making bowls and other turned objects.

Ash, though, is poorly resistant to decay and insects and is not commonly used for outdoor applications. Ideally, it should not be in constant contact with the ground or it will start decaying.

Types/Species

Ash has many types and species and also some look-alikes, the most common of which are as follows:

  1. White Ash(Fraxinus Americana)
  2. Black Ash (Fraxinus nigra) – darker than the white ash, it is soft with an 850 lbf Janka rating and is used for making tool handles, boxes, flooring, baskets, and electric guitars.
  3. Blue Ash (Fraxinus quadrangulate) – Grows in the midwestern region of the United States. The inner bark turns blue when exposed to air, hence the name. It is hard and strong and is used for baseball bats, flooring, and tool handles.
  4. Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica) – It is moderately hard and easy to work with, found in eastern and central North America.
  5. Pumpkin Ash (Fraxinus profunda) – The trunk swells to take the shape of a pumpkin, hence the name.
  6. European Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) – grows in Europe and some parts of North America. High-demand, durable and Commercially valuable. The heartwood is dark, olive-brown.
  7. Tamo Ash (Fraxinus Lanuginosa) – Also called Japanese Ash, it is particularly known for a unique figuring pattern resembling peanut shells.
  8. Oregon Ash
  9. Pink Ash
  10. Red Ash
  11. Swamp Ash
  12. Mountain Ash

* Not all of the above are necessarily species of ash wood.

How to Buy the Best Quality Ash Wood Online?

Now that you know everything about ash wood properties, you must be looking for the best reliable supplier for top-quality ash timber at wholesale price. Your search ends here. We are a wholesale seller and exporter of ash hardwood and supply to our clients in 20+ countries across Asia, Europe, America, the Middle East, and Australia. Contact us to enquire about the availability and best price for premium ash wood and timber.

Maple Wood Properties, Types & Uses in Detail

Maple Wood Properties

Maple Wood Properties

Maple wood comes in many varieties, all of which fall into either of two categories – hard maple and soft maple. Hard maple, as obvious, is harder and heavier than the alternative. It is generally more expensive than soft maple species because of its high demand and uses. Here you can read all about the properties, types and various uses of maple wood in detail.

What is Maple Wood?

It is a popular hardwood species used in many applications such as furniture making. The beautiful look and straight grain of maple makes it a preferred choice for a variety of woodworking projects. The maple furniture looks great naturally as well as after finishing or staining.

Hard Maple, also known as sugar maple or rock maple, is the most commonly found and used type of maple wood. It’s also the one with the best properties.

Types of Maple

Hard Maple Species:

  • Sugar Maple
  • Black Maple
  • Florida Maple

Soft Maple Species:

  • Red Maple
  • Silver Maple
  • Striped Maple
  • Bigleaf Maple
  • Box Elder

Maple Wood Properties

Hard maple trees are commonly found in Northeastern North America but also grow in some parts of Canada. The scientific name for the wood is Acer saccharum. The trees are about 80-115 ft (25-35 m) tall and have a 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diameter. The janka rating of 1,450 lbf (6,450 N) means the wood is pretty hard. The average dried weight is 705 kg/m3, which means it is also heavy. Despite all that, maple is considered easy to work with, owing to its usually straight grain.

As for the appearance, hard maple has a nearly white or off-white coloured sapwood, which is the most commonly used part of the tree. There are mineral streaks present all over the body, adding some brownish hue to the wood. The heartwood is darker red or brown and particularly unusable. It is known for its distinct birdseye figured grain that is high in demand and cost. Other grain patterns such as curly, rippled, flame, and quilted are also not uncommon. The colour of light maple wood might darken with age and constant exposure to sunlight and oxygen. Maple looks great both in its natural state and as a stained timber.

Hard maple has a generally straight, but sometimes figured or wavy, grain with a fine, smooth texture. The wood is durable in terms of resistance to insects, decay and rot. It’s also water and shock resistant, which makes it suitable for both indoor and outdoor projects. Maple is easy to work with. The straight grain goes easy on both machine and hand tools. Though the higher density of hard maple can sometimes be a problem in cutting operations. Also, maple will sometimes burn when cut with high-speed cutters. It finishes, turners, and glues well. It can be stained but blotches can occur when staining without a pre-conditioner.

Uses

Maple is extensively used in both indoor and outdoor applications. It has good durability, which makes it suitable for outdoor uses such as flooring. It is also very commonly used in furniture making. Flooring for residential premises, bowling alleys, basketball courts, dance floors and all kinds of commercial facilities are made of hard maple. Other common uses of maple wood include veneers, kitchen accessories, cutting boards, cabinets, sports equipment such as baseball bats, paper wood, musical instruments, workbenches, turned objects, butcher blocks, and specialty wood items.

Hard maple or sugar maple trees are the primary source for maple syrup.

Availability & Cost

It is easily available and moderately priced. Hard maple grows slowly but has plenty of availability. Figured pieces can be more valuable and highly priced. Soft maple is less expensive than hard maple but shares similar characteristics, except for hardness. Imported maple wood can be slightly costlier.

Hard Vs Soft maple

The primary difference between hard and soft maple is hardness. Hard maple is harder and denser and weighs more than soft maple species. Hard maple trees grow slower, which is why their grain is tight and dense. The colour of hard maple species is lighter as compared to the colour of soft maple, which grows faster and is easily available at a less expensive price. Hard maple can be slightly more expensive, especially figure pieces such as quilt or birdseye.

How to Buy Maple Wood at the Best price online

Maple has so many species that one can easily get confused when looking to buy the best quality hard maple online. When buying maple wood, make sure to ask these questions: is it real maple? Is it solid wood? Is it good quality? Was it sustainably-sourced?

Here at CameroonTimberExportSARL, we sell top quality, all-natural hard maple wood and timber. All our wood is FSC-certified and sustainably-sourced and we guarantee the best price for our wood. We export our wood to all major countries across Asia, Europe, Africa, America and other continents. Contact us to buy the best maple wood at wholesale rates.

11 Popular Types of Oak Wood For Woodworking

oak Wood Types

oak Wood Types

Oak is a very popular hardwood that is used in all parts of the world. It looks beautiful and is easily available at a decent price, but what makes oak truly precious is the fact that you can use this wood for practically any purpose. From furniture making to construction, firewood and arts and crafts, it is popular and used everywhere. In this article, we will talk about the different types and species of oak wood.

If you are looking to buy oak wood for a project, it might help to know about the different types or species of oak. Because different oak species share similar but slightly different properties, this guide to the types of oak wood can help you select the best variety for your project.

About Oak Wood, Properties & Uses

Oak is a hardwood, particularly known for its unmatched beauty, ease of work and a reasonable price with worldwide availability. The colour of oak will range from light brown to dark red in different species and gets darker with age and exposure to sunlight. It is a durable wood and some species are resistant to decay and moisture.

As a versatile wood, oak is adaptable and usable for any purpose. The wood is very easy to work with and is used for everything from making furniture to building frames, tables, barrels, flooring, decking, veneers, plywood, panelling, joinery, and more.

Types of Oak Wood

All types of oak can be divided into two major categories: White Oak and Red Oak. The major difference between the two is that white oak has a closed pore structure, while red oak has open pores.

There are almost 20 types of oak trees, of which only about 10 or 11 are used for wood.

1. Red Oak

  • Scientific Name: Quercus rubra
  • Distribution: Northeastern U.S. and Southeastern Canada
  • Janka Hardness: 1,220 lbf (5,430 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown with a reddish cast, pale sapwood
  • Tree height: 80-115 ft (25-35 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-6 ft (1-2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 43.8 lbs/ft3 (700 kg/m3)
  • Grain: straight with uneven, coarse texture
  • Pores: large and open
  • Durability: low
  • Rot Resistance: poor
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced, less expensive than white oak
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

2. White Oak

  • Scientific Name: Quercus alba
  • Distribution: Eastern U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,350 lbf (5,990 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown heartwood with an olive cast, Paler sapwood
  • Tree height: 65-85 ft (20-25 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-4 ft (1-1.2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 47.0 lbs/ft3 (755 kg/m3)
  • Grain: straight with coarse, uneven texture
  • Durability: very high
  • Rot Resistance: very good
  • Workability: Easy to use with both hand & machine tools. Glues, stains, bends and finishes well
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced (more expensive than red oak)
  • Uses: Cabinetry, boatbuilding, barrels, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

3. Black Oak

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus velutina
  • Distribution: Eastern North America
  • Janka Hardness: 1,210 lbf (5,380 N)
  • Colour: light to medium reddish-brown
  • Tree height: 65-80 ft (20-25 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 45 lbs/ft3 (715 kg/m3)
  • Grain: coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large
  • Durability: Slightly to non-durable
  • Rot Resistance: average
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

4. European Oak (English oak)

  • Type: White oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus robur
  • Distribution: Europe, Asia Minor, North Africa
  • Janka Hardness: 1,120 lbf (4,980 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown
  • Tree height: 80-115 ft (24-35 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 42 lbs/ft3 (675 kg/m3)
  • Grain: straight with uneven, coarse texture, sometimes irregular or interlocked grain
  • Pores: ring-porous
  • Durability: Good
  • Rot Resistance: very good
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: widely available in Europe, moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, barrels, boatbuilding, interior trim, decoration, flooring, furniture, and veneer

5. Cherry Bark Oak

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus pagoda
  • Distribution: Eastern U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,480 lbf (6,580 N)
  • Colour: light to medium reddish-brown
  • Tree height: 80-100 ft (25-30 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 49 lbs/ft3 (785 kg/m3)
  • Grain: coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large
  • Durability: Minimal
  • Rot Resistance: average
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

6. Pin Oak

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus palustris
  • Distribution: Eastern U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,500 lbf (6,650 N)
  • Colour: light to medium reddish-brown
  • Tree height: 50-75 ft (15-23 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 2-4 ft (.6-1.2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 44 lbs/ft3 (705 kg/m3)
  • Grain: fairly coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large ring-porous
  • Durability: Minimal
  • Rot Resistance: average
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

7. California Black Oak (Kellogg Oak)

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus kelloggii
  • Distribution: Western U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,090 lbf (4,840 N)
  • Colour: light to medium reddish-brown
  • Tree height: 65-80 ft (20-25 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-4 ft (1-1.2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 39 lbs/ft3 (620 kg/m3)
  • Grain: coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large
  • Durability: slightly durable to non-durable
  • Rot Resistance: average
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

8. Willow Oak

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus phellos
  • Distribution: Eastern U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,460 lbf (6,490 N)
  • Colour: light to medium reddish-brown
  • Tree height: 65-100 ft (20-30 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 48 lbs/ft3 (770 kg/m3)
  • Grain: coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large
  • Durability: Minimal
  • Rot Resistance: average
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

9. Bur Oak

    Type: White oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus macrocarpa
  • Distribution: Eastern and Midwestern U.S. and south-central Canada
  • Janka Hardness: 1,360 lbf (6,030 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown
  • Tree height: 80-100 ft (24-30 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 45 lbs/ft3 (725 kg/m3)
  • Grain: coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large, ring-porous
  • Durability: Average
  • Rot Resistance: very good
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, barrels, boatbuilding, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

10. North Red Oak

  • Type: Red oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus rubra
  • Distribution: northeastern North America
  • Janka Hardness: 1,220 lbf (5,430 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown with a reddish cast, pale sapwood
  • Tree height: 80-115 ft (25-35 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 3-6 ft (1-2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 43.8 lbs/ft3 (700 kg/m3)
  • Grain: straight with uneven, coarse texture
  • Pores: large and open
  • Durability: low durability but high strength and sturdiness
  • Rot Resistance: poor
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced, less expensive than white oak
  • Uses: Cabinetry, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

11. Chestnut Oak

  • Type: White oak
  • Scientific Name: Quercus prinus
  • Distribution: Eastern U.S.
  • Janka Hardness: 1,130 lbf (5,030 N)
  • Colour: light to medium brown
  • Tree height: 60-70 ft (18-22 m)
  • Trunk diameter: 2-4 ft (.6-1.2 m)
  • Average Dried Weight: 47 lbs/ft3 (750 kg/m3)
  • Grain: fairly coarse
  • Pores: medium-to-large
  • Durability: Good
  • Rot Resistance: Very good
  • Workability: Easy to use, glue, stain and finish
  • Pricing & Availability: moderately priced
  • Uses: Cabinetry, boatbuilding, barrels, interior trim, flooring, furniture, and veneer

Other less famous types of oak and similar species include hairy oak, southern silky oak, northern silky oak, bog oak, sessile oak, turkey oak, Japanese oak, Oregon white oak, brown oak, Shumard oak, holm oak, live oak, scarlet oak, southern red oak, post oak, Laurel oak, overcup oak, and water oak.

Spruce Wood: Properties, Types & Uses

Spruce Wood Properties Types & Uses

Spruce Wood Properties Types & Uses

Spruce is a popular softwood that is known for its use in producing paper pulp and also in the construction industry for making doors, furniture, panelling, and interior trim. Spruce is also commonly used for making the soundboards of some musical instruments. It’s lightweight and stable wood that is not very durable or hard but is available widely and comes at a cheap price.

Here’s everything you need to know about Spruce wood properties, types and uses.

About Spruce

Spruce is a softwood that is often used as an alternative to pine because they both share similar density and strength characteristics. Because it is softwood with low hardness and density, spruce is often prone to dents and scratches, which is why it is not very suitable for outdoor uses and flooring.

Spruce hails from the Pinaceae family of coniferous trees. It has many species, all of which bear the scientific name Picea. Spruce trees are about 20 to 60 m tall. Some species such as Sitka spruce can have mature trees as tall as 250-300 feet.

All Spruce species are basically the same in terms of appearance, durability and workability. The wood colour ranges from creamy white to yellowish-brown or red. It has a fine, even texture and a straight grain. Spruce is almost non-durable in terms of resistance to rot and decay. It is generally easy to work with, though the presence of knots can sometimes cause problems. It glues and finishes well, but staining can result in blotchy or inconsistent results.

Types (Species) & Spruce Wood Properties

There are a total of 35 species of Spruce, of which White spruce, Sitka spruce, Norway spruce, and Black spruce are the most famous. Here’s a brief overview of the spruce species and their respective properties.

1. White Spruce Wood

White Spruce
Colour: White spruce is white or yellowish coloured and has creamy white sapwood. Black knots may be present.

Grain: It has a straight grain and a uniform texture.

Durability: Low to moderate, it is stable and has basic resistance to rot.

Trees:Trees are about 34 metres tall and have a 6–1.0 m trunk diameter. The white spruce trees are primarily found in Northern North America.

Strength and hardness: Janka rating is 480 lbf and the average dried weight is 425 kg/m3, which means the wood is neither hard nor heavy.

Workability and uses: It is generally easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Common uses include paper pulp, construction lumber, crates, and millwork.

2. Sitka Spruce Wood

Sitka Spruce
Colour: Sitka spruce heartwood is cream/white to yellow, sometimes with a fine pinkish-red hue. The sapwood is creamy white and not clearly distinguishable. Sitka timber is also known to sometimes have a distinct grain pattern called bearclaw.

Grain: It has a straight grain and a uniform, fine texture.

Durability: Low durability and slight to no resistance to decay.

Trees: Trees are about 40-50 metres tall and have a 1.2-1.8 m trunk diameter. The Sitka spruce trees are native to Northwestern North America.

Strength and hardness: Janka rating is 510 lbf and the average dried weight is 425 kg/m3, which means the wood is neither hard nor heavy.

Workability and uses: It is generally easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Sitka spruce is easily available and cheap, however, the wood produced from old trees or quarter sawn lumber free of knots can be quite expensive.
Sitka spruce is used for construction lumber, crates, boxes, millwork, furniture, soundboards of musical instruments, masts and spars for boats, aircraft components, wind turbine blades, etc.

3. Norway Spruce Wood

Norway Spruce
Scientific name: Picea abies; other names: European Spruce, German Spruce

Colour: Norway spruce is creamy white with a yellowish-red hue and has creamy white sapwood.

Grain: It has a straight grain and a fine, even texture.

Durability: Poor resistance to decay

Trees: Trees are about 35-55 metres tall and have a 1-1.5 m trunk diameter. The Norway spruce trees are primarily found in Northern and Central Europe.

Strength and hardness: Janka rating is 380 lbf and the average dried weight is 405 kg/m3, which means the wood is neither hard nor heavy.

Workability and Uses: It is generally easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Staining can be inconsistent. Norway Spruce is easily and widely available at cheap prices. Common uses include paper pulp, construction lumber, Christmas trees, crates, musical instruments, and millwork.

4. Black Spruce Wood

Black Spruce
Scientific name: Picea mariana

Colour: Black spruce is creamy white or yellowish coloured and has almost white sapwood.

Grain: It has a straight grain and a fine, uniform texture.

Durability: The heartwood is poorly or slightly resistant to decay but it is non durable.

Trees: Trees are about 10-15 metres tall and have a .3-.5 m trunk diameter. The Black spruce trees are primarily found in Northern North America.

Strength and hardness: Janka rating is 520 lbf and the average dried weight is 450 kg/m3, which means the wood is neither hard nor heavy.

Workability and uses: It is generally easy to work with and glues and finishes well. Spruce is easy and cheap to buy, but old tree woods are expensive. Common uses include paper pulp, construction lumber, crates, and millwork.

5. Red Spruce Wood

Red Spruce
Scientific name: Picea rubens

Colour: Red spruce is creamy white with a yellow or red hue and has creamy white sapwood.

Grain: It has a straight grain and a fine, even texture.

Durability: the heartwood is slightly or non-resistance to rot.

Trees: Trees are about 24-34 metres tall and have a 6–1.4 m trunk diameter. The Red spruce trees are primarily found in Eastern North America.

Strength and hardness: Janka rating is 490 lbf and the average dried weight is 435 kg/m3, which means the wood is neither hard nor heavy.

Workability and uses: It is generally easy to work with if there are no knots present and glues and finishes well. Locally-sourced spruce is cheap but imported wood and ones procured from old trees can be expensive. Common uses include paper pulp, construction lumber, crates, Christmas trees, musical instruments, and millwork.

Availability, Price & Uses of Spruce Wood

Construction-grade spruce is easily available and inexpensively priced, especially the locally-sourced wood. Imported wood can be moderately priced. Different species of spruce come from different regions around the world. Norway Spruce, for instance, is found in Europe, while Sitka spruce and White spruce are limited to North American countries.

Instrument-grade Norway Spruce is the most expensive of all species of spruce wood.

Common uses of spruce include paper pulp, furniture, construction, lumber, crates and boxes, millwork, and soundboards for musical instruments.

Why use Spruce Wood (and Why Not)

Spruce is one of the popular softwood species, which is both inexpensive and widely available.

The top advantages of Spruce include low cost, uniform texture, great workability, and basic resistance to rot. Spruce is often treated to make it more durable and resistant, but it can be expensive.

Spruce also has some disadvantages. For one, it is not very durable and cannot be used for outdoor applications. It also needs constant care and high maintenance. Spruce is prone to insect attacks and cannot be in contact with the earth, which is why it is not preferred for flooring.

Buy top quality Spruce wood at the best price online from CameroonTimberExportSARL.

Poplar Wood: Properties, Characteristics & Uses

Poplar Wood

Poplar Wood
Poplar, also called Black Poplar or Lombardy, is a hardwood used for plywood, furniture, lumber, construction, boxes and crates, and veneers, among other things. It’s a non-durable wood that is widely available at a low price. Veneers of poplar can, however, be expensive. Here’s everything else you need to know about Poplar wood properties and uses.

It is a light and cheap wood and is ideal for many uses. It is commonly used for making cheap furniture products, lumber, paper, crafts, boxes, plywood and other general utility items.

Poplar Wood Properties & Characteristics

poplar wood properties

Poplar has many names and species. Its scientific name is Populus nigra. It is found mainly in Europe, western Asia, and Northern Africa and is also planted as an ornamental plant in North America. The trees are about 65-100 ft (20-30 m) tall and have a 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m) trunk diameter. However, the white poplar and aspen poplar trees only grow to about 18m in height. The Janka rating of poplar is 460 lbf (2,020 N) and its dried weight is around 385 kg/m3, both of which indicate that the wood is neither heavy nor hard. On the contrary, it’s a lightweight wood.

Technical Poplar Wood Properties:

  • Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .31, .39
  • Modulus of Rupture: 9,230 lbf/in2 (63.7 MPa)
  • Elastic Modulus: 1,045,000 lbf/in2 (7.21 GPa)
  • Crushing Strength: 5,220 lbf/in2 (36.0 MPa)
  • Shrinkage: Radial: 4.0%, Tangential: 9.3%, Volumetric: 12.3%, T/R Ratio: 2.3

In terms of appearance, it has a light brown-yellowish heartwood, while the sapwood is pale yellow or almost white. Poplar sometimes has a unique burl on its surface, which is quite popular and in demand and sold and used as Mappa or Mapa. It has a generally straight but sometimes interlocked or irregular grain and the texture is fine uniform medium.

In terms of strength and durability, it is non-durable and is prone to insect attack. It is also non-resistant to rot and moisture and is therefore not suitable for outdoor uses. Treatment must be used for wood if planning to use it outside or for flooring.

Despite being a hardwood, poplar is very soft, though it is strong for its weight The wood is easy to work with, cuts easily and is equally easy to glue and finish, though planing with regular cutters may lead to fuzzy surfaces (need sharp cutters for planing followed by fine-sanding to obtain smooth surfaces). Drying can cause the wood to warp or change shape. Poplar can be stained but the results are generally patchy because of the wood’s inconsistent absorption of stain, though it paints very well and looks premium after a good finish.

Because poplar is soft and light, it can get dents and scratches easily and is not therefore suitable for heavy-duty applications such as flooring.

Poplar has many species, of which the black Italian poplar is considered the best in terms of working abilities while white and grey species are among the worst. European aspen is also considered a good quality timber.

Poplar Availability, Price & Uses

It is easily available in many parts of the world and imported in other countries. In Europe, it is commonly sold and used as a utility lumber. In North America, it is mainly harvested as ornamental trees. Poplar is also grown in many parts of Africa. CameroonTimberExportSARL, which is one of the biggest suppliers of poplar wood in Northern Africa, supplies and exports top-quality poplar wood at wholesale rates all over the world. Contact us for the best price for its timber and hardwood logs.

While domestically grown poplar hardwood is generally low-priced, burl sections of poplar trees, which are generally sold and used as veneer sheets, can be quite expensive.

As a utility timber, poplar is used for everything from construction to furniture, plywood, boxes and crates, laminated lumber for construction, furniture carcasses, kitchen cabinets, carvings, doors, panelling, turnings, moulding, etc. Black poplar burl or Mappa burl is also used for decorative purposes and veneers, fine furniture, inlays, and drum shells.

Advantages & Disadvantages of Poplar Wood

Like any other wood or timber, it has its pros and cons, which you should know in order to determine whether or not it is the right wood for your project. Here you go.

Advantages of Poplar

1. Easy to work: Poplar is soft and therefore easy to work with both machine and hand tools. It cuts, dries and plans easily. The wood doesn’t usually have interlocked grain and cuts easily. The light weight of poplar makes it easy to transport and lift (for work on heights).

2. Inexpensive and widely available: One of the biggest advantages of poplar is that it comes cheap and is easily available.

Disadvantages of Poplar

1. Not hard or durable: Despite being a hardwood, poplar is rather soft with low density and hardness, so it dents and scratches easily and is also not suitable for heavy uses, construction, flooring, etc.

2. Requires high maintenance: Because it is soft, it requires constant care and maintenance. It is also prone to insect attacks and rot.

Other than that, poplar wood is not easy to stain (as we already explained above) and is not suitable for outdoor uses. It can, however, be vastly used for general applications, furniture, doors, cabinets, and everything else.

If you are looking to buy sustainable, best-quality poplar hardwood or timber at wholesale rates or need to know more about poplar species, feel free to contact us to talk to an expert.

Brazilian Cherry Hardwood Flooring: An Ultimate Guide

Brazilian cherry hardwood flooring

Brazilian cherry hardwood flooring
Brazilian Cherry is a hardwood commonly found in the rainforests of Brazil. However, contrary to its name, this wood species doesn’t have anything to do with cherries. Also known by names of jatoba, locust, and courbail, It is mainly famous for its attractive deep red color, which makes it suitable for flooring among other things.

There was a time when it was a common choice for home construction. Though it is not as popular today, it continues to remain a top choice. It can be purchased and used in many forms, from solid planks to sawn timber and plastic laminates. Here’s everything you need to know about Brazilian Cherry hardwood flooring.

About Brazilian Cherry

It is a reddish-brown colored hardwood often with darker stripes. It can become darker upon exposure to sunlight. The trees have a light greyish yellow sapwood. It grows in Central America, southern Mexico, northern South America, and the West Indies. The trees are about 30-40 m tall with a 0.6-1.2 m trunk diameter. The wood is quite hard and dense.

The grain is typically interlocked and the wood has a medium texture. It is rated as very durable in terms of resistance to rot, termites and other insects, but can be prone to marine borers. Because of its high density, Jatoba can be difficult to work with, but it turns, glues, stains, and finishes well. It is easily available in a variety of lumber sizes and is inexpensively priced.

The wood is used for flooring, furniture, shipbuilding, cabinetry, turned objects, tool handles, railroad tires, and other specialty items.

Types of Brazilian Cherry Wood Flooring

When it comes to the use of Brazilian Cherry hardwood for flooring, there are multiple options available to choose from based on price, sustainability, quality, appearance, and your personal preferences.

  1. Solid Hardwood Flooring
  2. Brazilian Cherry hardwood flooring is the most popular, but it can also be quite expensive. It is available in two standard sizes:
    .75-inch thick and 3.25-inches wide plank boards. These boards come in lengths ranging from a few inches to a few feet.
    .75-inch thick and 5-inches wide boards.
    Solid hardwood flooring is the best option out of all because it maintains the premium natural look of the wood, is strong and very durable and can be looked both inside and outside.

  3. Laminate Flooring
  4. It is also commonly used for laminate flooring, which looks absolutely stunning and is the best, cost-effective alternative to solid wood. As you may know, laminate floorings are made of plastic and contain zero wood. So, it may feel a little hard, cold and not as comfortable as solid wood. It is easier to install though.

  5. Engineered Wood Flooring
  6. Engineered wood is a type of manufactured wood that is made by using solid wood and other materials to improve its characteristics and reduce the cost.

    Brazilian Cherry engineered wood flooring falls between laminate and solid wood in terms of strength, appearance and cost. The engineered wood is made by combining thin layers of jatoba and other plywood-type material, which are glued together to form a strong and stable board. This is less expensive and more sustainable (eco-friendly) than the pure wood alternative.

  7. Prefinished Wood Flooring
  8. Prefinished flooring comes ready to install and use and reduces the time on staining and finishing. Because the finishing is done off-site, you also do not have to bear with paint smell or mess. However, this type of flooring can get easily damaged during installation.

  9. Unfinished Flooring
  10. This type of flooring comes unfinished and can be used as it is. It retains the natural pinkish-red color of the Brazilian Cherry hardwood, which is preferred by many over the darker reddish-brown tone achieved through staining and finishing.

  11. Handscraped Flooring
  12. In this type of hardwood flooring, the wood is machine-textured to create the appearance of shallow grooves like in hand-scraped floors popular in classic designs.

  13. Vinyl Flooring
  14. Vinyl is used in place of real wood to create flooring that looks similar to Brazilian Cherry but doesn’t have any real wood. It can be created in many forms and designs, handscrapped flooring, and others. The benefit of vinyl over solid wood is that the former is waterproof.

When selecting or buying Brazilian Cherry wood flooring, you need to consider many things, including the price. If the price is not an issue, solid hardwood is almost always the best option. However, if you are looking for more economic options, there is laminate or vinyl or engineered wood you can choose.

If you are looking to buy top-quality Brazilian Cherry solid wood for flooring, do visit our official website to explore and choose from our wide range of wood species. We can provide this wood in all standard sizes as well as custom sizes based on your requirements and export our wood all over the world.

Beech Vs Pine Wood: Choosing the Best Wood for Your Project

beech vs pine wood

beech vs pine wood
When looking to start a woodworking project, one of the hardest things in my opinion is choosing the right wood. And why not? There are so many options available when it comes to wood species that even the most experienced woodworkers can get easily confused.

So that you do not get confused when selecting wood for your project and to save your precious time, we will today talk about the two most favourable timber options for woodworking – Beech vs Pine wood.

What is Pine?

Pine is a softwood, one that is extensively used for making furniture and other projects. It is one of the low-cost furniture wood options and is suitable both for indoor and outdoor projects. Pine is easily and widely available all over the world at a comparatively low price.

Pine has many variants or species, namely Western White Pine, Eastern White Pine, Jeffrey Pine, Limber Pine, Red Pine, Spruce Pine, and others, only some of which are appropriate for industrial usage. Pine is light brown in color and has a straight grain with a medium texture. It is considered strong but is only moderately durable in terms of decay resistance. Pine is generally easy to work with. It is widely available and is less expensive than other furniture woods.

Common uses of pine wood include furniture, construction lumber, boxes, carving, crates, boatbuilding, plywood, and interior millwork.

What is Beech?

Beech is a hardwood and is found mainly in Europe, Asia, and some parts of America. The color is pale yellow or brown and turns darker with steaming. It has a straight grain and medium texture. In terms of durability, Beech is practically non-durable and has poor resistance to insects. It is easy to work with. Beech is preferred for non-expensive woodworking projects, as it is widely and easily available at an economical price.

Common uses of Beech wood include veneering, furniture, flooring, boatbuilding, lumber, cabinetry, plywood, turned objects, and musical instruments.

Beech Vs Pine Wood

One difference, as you may have noticed, between pine and beech is durability. Despite being a hardwood, beech is less durable than pine. Let’s talk about some other differences between these two kinds of furniture wood.

Uses

Pine has many possible applications and is used in a large variety of projects, including both industrial and domestic uses. In industries, pine is primarily used for making paper. Pine is easy to work with, shape and stain, which makes it suitable for use in interior projects such as furniture making, flooring, paneling, veneering, roofing, and window frames. It is moderately durable and has good rot resistance, which is why pine is also used in some exterior applications such as decking. However, direct contact with soil can cause decay or insect attacks in the wood.

Beechwood has low durability but it burns superbly, which is why the wood is extensively used as firewood. European beech is more dense and heavy and suitable for projects like furniture making, flooring, and construction. The natural sweetness of beech can add flavours when used for smoking foods. Beech is also commonly used for making guitar bodies, drums and other musical instruments. It is also considered one of the best timbers for making houses and log cabins.

Appearance

Pine is light brown or yellowish with an occasional reddish hue. The sapwood is almost white. The wood color will darken with age. It has a straight grain with medium texture/

Beech is light pinkish in color and has a straight grain with a uniform texture. The steaming of wood can result in a darkened, reddish-brown color hue.

Durability

Pine is moderately durable and can withstand basic weather changes and moisture but will decay when in direct contact with soil or liquid. Beech is almost non-durable and cannot be used in places with direct exposure to sunlight and/or moisture.

Workability

Both pine and beech are easy to work with. Pine is soft, medium-dense and easy to cut with hand and machine tools. It glues, nails, screws and bends well. Beech bends and turns well and can be easily glued and finished.

Availability & Price

Pine is a sustainable wood, as it grows fast. It is also easily available at a low price and can be imported worldwide. Beech is not a sustainable wood because it has a long growth period of 10 years or more. The wood is, however, easily available and is not expensive.

How to Choose the Best Wood: Pine Vs Beech

If you need help choosing the best wood for your indoor/outdoor project, we at CameroonTimberExportSARL also provide wood consulting, where you can ask our top experts your questions and get timely resolutions to your timber-related queries. Alternatively, you can explore our huge range of premium hardwood and softwood timbers and place your order online to get attractive prices and offers with worldwide shipping. Visit our official website to get started.

Air Dried Vs Kiln Dried Timber (Wood): What’s the Difference?

air dried vs kiln dried

air dried vs kiln dried

As you may already know, timber generally contains natural moisture, which needs to be dried before the wood can be used for specific purposes like construction and flooring. Air Dried Vs Kiln Dried, both happen to be two of the most popular types of dried timber that have been perfected for any woodworking project.

Why Wood Needs to be Dried?

Fresh timber harvested from trees contains a large amount of moisture in it, which makes it inapt for practically any purpose, from burning to furniture making. Timber with high water content will be difficult to burn and might not be suitable for any steady use like construction, where the timber needs to be sturdy and hard. Why? Because over time, the fresh timber will start drying and lose moisture, which will make the wood shrink and change its properties, which can make the object (furniture, etc.) change its shape or become weak.

Moreover, the moisture in timber can reduce its durability and make it prone to insect attacks. For all these reasons, timber needs to be dried properly before use.

How much Drying is Needed for Fresh Timber

Any freshly harvested timber needs to be dried enough to bring the mixture levels down to 7% to 9%, which is suitable for furniture and other industrial work. Timber intended to be used for firewood should have not more than 20% moisture content.

Air Dried Vs Kiln Dried: How to Dry Wood

There are two ways to dry wood:

  1. Leave it and let it dry naturally
  2. Force dry it using methods such as kiln-drying

Let’s get to know more about the two methods of timber Drying.

Air Drying – Natural Way to Dry Wood

air drying wood

Air-dried timber is produced by letting the timber dry naturally through the flow of natural air by keeping it in an open space. As you can imagine, this is a slow and time-consuming process. But, it’s also the least expensive method of drying timber. Here’s how it works.

The freshly sawn wood is cut into lumbers or kept in logs, which are then arranged in layers such that each layer is separated from the other using small wooden blocks to maintain at least a 1-inch gap to allow air to pass freely between timber layers. For the air drying method to work best, timber should be kept in an open space with a good and constant flow of air. However, the area should be covered so that rain and other weather conditions do not interfere with the process or delay it further.

As one can imagine, this is a cost-effective method of wood drying, as it involves limited resources, however, the process might take a few months to more than a year depending on the wind and weather conditions in a particular region. To speed up the air drying process of timber, sometimes heavy-duty fans are used in industrial settings.

Kiln-Drying – Drying Wood Using Machines

Kiln Drying Wood
Kiln drying is the process of drying timber by keeping it in a closed chamber called a kiln under specific temperature and humidity conditions and passing air through the wood to force the moisture out. Here’s how it works.

Timber is arranged in layers in the kiln chamber under specific temperature and humidity. Then, the air is passed through the timber by using heavy-duty fans. The temperature makes the air hot and it forces water molecules in the wood to pop out.

This is a faster way of drying wood, but it can be expensive to set up a kiln and manage resources, which is why this method is generally used in industries only. It can take a few weeks to up to a couple of months for the wood to dry completely using this method. High-density hardwoods may take longer to dry as compared to low-density softwoods.

If you are wondering what are the differences between air-dried timber and kiln-dried timber, here you go.

Air Dried Vs Kiln dried Wood

Time: As we mentioned before, air drying is a long process and may easily take up to or more than 1 year in some cases. Kiln-drying, on the other hand, is a faster way to dry wood and can be done in a few weeks’ time.

Cost: Kiln drying is expensive because it involves the use of a specific set-up, with a large chamber. Air drying is inexpensive.

Quality: The wood produced in the air-drying method is of good quality, has fewer cracks, doesn’t lose its color and would not get easily affected by mould and decay. Also, the process causes no internal tensions in the wood, so it’s easy to work with.
Kiln-dried wood is well-dried and has a low moisture content. Also, the method will remove bugs, ensuring overall better quality of wood. However, the timber might lose color after kiln drying and grains may be affected by internal tensions, which can lead to problems while working. Kiln-dried wood needs to be stored in a climate-control environment, as it will absorb moisture quickly after drying.

Resources required: Air drying requires more space but almost zero resources. Kiln drying requires less space, but it needs specific resources, including high-temperature conditions.

Control: The process and time taken in the air drying method cannot be controlled. The process and results of kiln drying can be controlled.

Uses: While air-dried timber is mainly used for fencing, outdoor furniture, patio, and decking, kiln-dried timber is used for furniture, flooring, and cabinets.

Overall, in terms of quality and results, air-dried wood is better than kiln-dried, however, the process of air-drying wood can be quite long and tiresome.

Whether you are looking to buy naturally air-dried wood or kiln-dried timber or looking for the best place to dry your wood, contact CameroonTimberExportSARL for the best timber products and services. We can provide you with top-quality wood timber as well as high-quality wood drying services at reasonable prices. Call us today to discuss.